A Traditional Christmas Eve Baked Stuffed Lobster Tail Recipe Sure to Please

For families all across the country, the traditional Christmas Eve dinner is celebrated with lobster as either the main course or a first course. This year, for many chefs,  baked stuffed lobster tails will take center stage.

Here is a traditional baked stuffed lobster tail recipe, courtesy of Chef Christopher Russel of Boothbay Harbor, Maine.  Russell is a former Maine Lobster Council Chef of the Year.

baked stuffed Maine lobster tail on a plate
Traditional baked stuff lobster tail (Maine Lobster Council).

Be sure to select fresh, live Maine  lobster. Hard shell lobster are best as the tails will be larger and more succulent.  The dish is easy to prepare and is always sure to please all your guests.

Plan on one  1-1/2  pound-lobster per person, or if convenience dictates,  fresh or frozen lobster tails may be purchased instead of whole live lobster.


(4 servings, cook time 20 minutes,  preparation 25 minutes, total meal in 45 minutes)

4 live Maine lobsters, each 1-1/2 pounds *
8 Tablespoons butter
2 Cups finely chopped onions (about 2 medium)
4 Tablespoons  fresh parsley finely chopped
2 Teaspoons Old Bay seafood seasoning
4 Tablespoons fresh squeezed lemon juice
4 Cups Ritz crackers crumbled (6 ounces)


Boil salted water in a large kettle or pot. Cook the whole lobsters for 5 minutes. Remove lobsters and place in an ice water tub to cool.  Crack and pick the meat from the claws, knuckles and body. Chop lobster meat into bite-sized pieces. Set aside. Split the tails lengthwise down the center with a sharp knife, being sure to keep the shell-side of the lobsters facing up. Make sure to keep the shells intact. Remove the tail meat from the shell and remove the intestinal track from the meat. Then carefully insert the whole tail meat back into the shell.

For the stuffing, melt the butter in a skillet over medium heat. Add the chopped onion. Sauté until soft. Stir in the parsley, Old Bay seasoning and lemon juice. Remove the skillet from heat and let cool. Stir in the chopped lobster claw and knuckle meat. Gently add in the cracker crumbs and stir. Using a spoon, add the the stuffing into the lobster tails. Refrigerate the lobster tails until ready to bake. When ready, preheat the oven to 425-degrees .  Bake the tails until the stuffing is golden and crisp,  about 15 – 20 minutes. Serve immediately with wedges of lemon and let the dinner party begin!


Per serving:

658 calories

46 grams protein

37 grams carbohydrates

36 grams fat

1196 mg. sodium

2 grams fiber

* Instead of whole lobster, the dish may also be prepared with frozen Maine lobster tails. Boil water and just blanch the tails and carefully remove the meat, leaving the shell intact. Substitute 16 ounces of raw Maine crab meat or shrimp instead of the lobster knuckle and claw meat. Sauté the crab meat or shrimp with the onion and finish preparing the stuffing and the lobster tails as directed.5

© Lobsters-online 2015


Thanksgiving Lobster Recipe with Seasonal Nutmeg and Chestnut Flavorings

No holiday is more New England than Thanksgiving. The holiday dinner is based on Pilgrim lore.  So adding  a first course of steamed Maine lobster served in the shell with nutmeg vinaigrette and chestnut puree would add a wonderful dimension to the Thanksgiving tradition.  Not to mention being a big hit for guests and family.
Happy Thanksgiving from Lobsters Online
The lobster recipe is from Boston celebrity Chef Todd English who is on the record for being a big fan of Thanksgiving day lobster.  The recipe first appeared in Food and Wine Magazine.  It is recommended that the nutmeg vinaigrette and chestnut puree be prepared the day before.  The lobster recipe calls for 10 1-1/4 pound live lobsters steamed, and then halved with the lobster meat served in the shell.
Steamed lobster on a cutting board
Steamed Lobster
The recipe will serve 20 people.
  • 2 cups chicken stock or canned low-sodium broth
  • 2 cups apple cider
  • shallots, minced
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • Two 15-ounce cans whole chestnuts packed in water, drained
  • 3 tablespoons pure maple syrup
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup crème fraîche or sour cream
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 4 large scallions, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons chopped parsley
  • Ten 1 1/4-pound steamed lobsters, halved
  • 1/4 pound mixed young salad greens 
  1. In a large saucepan, combine 1 cup of the stock with the cider, shallots, bay leaves and sherry vinegar. Boil over high heat until        reduced by half, about 25 minutes. Add the heavy cream and nutmeg and simmer over moderate heat until slightly thickened, about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat.
  2. In a medium saucepan, heat the vegetable oil. Add the onion and cook over moderate heat until softened. Add the remaining 1 cup of stock and the chestnuts and simmer until the liquid reduces by a third, about 4 minutes. Remove from the heat and add the maple syrup and butter. Transfer the contents of the saucepan to a blender and puree until smooth. Blend in the crème fraîche. Transfer the puree to a clean saucepan and season with salt and pepper. Cover and keep warm.
  3. Gently reheat the nutmeg vinaigrette. Add the scallions and parsley and season with salt and pepper.
  4. Cut the lobster tail meat into 1-inch chunks and replace it in the tail sections of the lobsters. Spoon half of the chestnut puree in the center of each of 2 large platters. Arrange the lobster halves around the puree. Spoon the warm nutmeg vinaigrette over the lobsters, garnish the platters with the greens and serve at once.

MAKE AHEAD The lobster recipe can be prepared through Step 2 and refrigerated overnight. Finish the vinaigrette and rewarm the chestnut puree before serving.

SELECTING A WINE The natural saltiness of lobster, as with any seafood, will amplify the flavor of a big fruity Chardonnay.  Go with a first course Chardonnay that is gently touched with fruit, and mostly un-oaked.


Tips for Cooking Fresh Maine Lobster Tails On a Gas Grill

Fresh lobster tails on the grill are perfect for just about any occasion. However, cooking lobster tails on the grill requires careful attention to timing and movement. Cooking over the dry heat of a gas grill can dry the lobster meat out or cause it to cook it unevenly. Lobster tails on the grill should be rotated on the grill to make sure the tail meat cooks evenly. And the tails should be turned only once. Start cooking the lobster tail with the flesh side down. Then for the last three minutes flip the lobster onto the shell side.

Maine lobster tail on a plate
Fresh Maine Lobster Tail Garnished with Lemon Slice and Asparagus


Split the lobster’s tails in half lengthwise and press the flesh open. Add the ingredients to a mixing bowl and stir. Brush the oil sauce onto the flesh side of the lobster tail. Pre-heat the grill to medium-high temperature. Place tails on the grill flesh side down and cook for seven minutes. Four minutes on the flesh side and three minutes on the shell side. Do not over cook. Remove the tails from the heat and serve immediately.

Prep Time: 13 minutes
Grill Time: 7 minutes
Total Time: About 20 minutes
Servings: Serves 3 to 6 (depending on how lucky your guests are)


  • 6 4-to-6 oz fresh lobster tails (make sure they are fully thawed if previously frozen)
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon fresh dill
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

As an option, garnish with fresh lemon slice and serve with grilled asparagus.  Grilled fresh lobster tails; outdoor entertaining at its best.

© Lobsters-Online.Com 2015

Steaming or boiling lobster. Which is best?

Steaming or boiling lobster?  That is the question.

With the great anticipation of the return of the outdoor cooking (bye bye winter),  lobster chef’s everywhere will soon be back to pondering the same old question.
Whether “tis better to boil or steam a live lobster.  What’s the best lobster recipe?
Two pound steamed Maine lobsters on a plate
Two Pound Steamed Maine Lobsters
 Boiling a Maine lobster is the easiest way to cook and serve a whole lobster and a boiled lobster is easier to pick clean. When you have that large picnic or party and the kettle is kept full all day with lobster, boiling is just so much easier.  But steaming a lobster often yields the best results for eating.
steamer kettle for lobster and clams
Traditional kettle for steaming clams
Here’s why:  steaming is a more gentle process of cooking the meat and it preserves more flavor and tenderness. Steaming a lobster is also more forgiving on the chef since it is harder to overcook a lobster in a steam pot.  For true lobster lovers, steaming is the way to go.
So let’s get started.
First step is to order some freshly caught, hard shell Maine lobster.  Hard shells are recommended as the lobsters are usually stronger and healthier and the hard shell lobster will have the most meat. 
Then choose a big four to five-gallon kettle or pot with a tight lid.  This size pot should be able to easily handle up to eight pounds of lobster.  Remember, don’t crowd the lobster into the pot or you will get uneven results.  It is best to have the right size pot.
Add two to three inches of sea water to the cover the bottom of the pot.  If you don’t have access to the Atlantic Ocean, don’t worry.  Use filtered fresh water and add lots of sea salt:  one to two tablespoons per quart.
Place a steaming rack inside the pot and use high heat to bring the water to a rolling boil.  If you wish, you may remove the rubber lobster claw bands.  Place the live lobster one at a time and head first into the pot and cover.  Start timing the lobster and do not overcook.
Hard Shell  Weight*
1 pound
8-10 minutes
1-1/4 pounds
10-12 minutes
1-1/2 pounds
12-14 minutes
1-3/4 pounds
15-17 minutes
2 pounds
16-18  minutes
2-1/2 pounds
18-20 minutes
3 pounds
20-30 minutes
5 pounds
35-45 (or more) minutes

*Reduce time by 3 minutes for soft shell lobster.
Half way through the allotted cook time, open the lid and move the lobster around in the pot.  It is important to shift the lobster so they all cook evenly.  If necessary, you may add a little more water but no more salt is required.
The most important step for all lobster chefs is determining when the lobsters are done.  The first rule, do not to overcook the lobster.  A lobster shell will be bright red when fully cooked and the meat white. 
So what’s the best way to tell when the lobsters are done?
Care must be taken with large lobster as they will be red but they may not be fully cooked.  And a lobster in the top of the pot may not have cooked as fast as one at the bottom.
One popular practice is to give one of the lobster antennae a good pull while the lobster is still in the steamer pot.    If the antenna pops off, it is a good sign the lobster is done.  Another step is to use tongs to remove one lobster and cut a small slice at the bottom of the tail.  If the meat is fully changed form translucent to white, it’s done.  Note: The lobster will continue to cook for a minute even after it’s taken out of the pot, so again, do not overcook.
Allow steamed lobster to drain for a minute. You may pierce the body and tail with a knife to help drain the water.  Then serve the lobster right away with a side of melted butter and a slice of lemon.   To make eating fun and easy, serve with lobster bib and steel cracker accessory kits.

Try This Tuscan Style Grilled Lobster Recipe for Father’s Day

Everyone who has ever been to Tuscany has fallen in love with its history, charm, and, of course, its FOOD!  Italian Tuscan style recipes have made their way all over — even to Cape Cod — so try this Tuscan Style grilled lobster recipe just in time for Father’s Day 2014.

Visitors to Italy often learn that the Italian food they eat there often does not look, or taste, the same as it does back home.  But the regional distinctions and flavors of Italy often translate very well to dishes prepared using our wonderful New England seafood.  From a Boston fine dining Ristorante to a seacoast resort, New Englanders love their seafood prepared with the flavors of Italy.

We are fortunate to have Chef Dan from the Lobster Trap Restaurant in Bourne, Mass share his recipe for Tuscan Style grilled whole lobster.  This Italian style dish has been given just the right Cape Cod touch.  Be sure to start with fresh, live hard-shell whole lobster.  Preparing whole live lobster for the grill can be a bit intimidating for first timers, but trust us, the results are worth it.  So go ahead and try Chef Dan’s Tuscan Style grilled lobster recipe.  And enjoy!.

Tuscan Style Grilled Lobster Recipe for Father’s Day

© Lobsters-Online.Com 2014

Original Lobster Dish Recipe Wanted


Calling all chefs — It’s that time of year to put your best original lobster dish recipe down on paper.  The Maine Lobster Council announced today that it is now accepting submissions for its Annual Maine Lobster Chef of the Year Competition.
The Lobster Chef Competition is a roll-up-your-sleeves cook-off that is part of the Harvest on the Harbor Festival celebrated in Portland, Maine in late October.  When you add “bold and innovative” to “fresh and local,” you’ve described the spirit of the event, according to festival organizers.  All recipes must be original and include Maine Lobster.  And based on past submissions, these folks do not fool around. 
A quick reading of past recipes is enough to bring both cooks and seafood lovers to their feet with a cheer. 

2010 Winner Lobster Tail Arugula  (Source: Maine Lobster Council)
The 2010 winning recipe was Herb Grilled Maine Lobster Tail on Arugula with Chive Ricotta Gnocchi &Corn Milk.   The recipe was from Chef Kelly Patrick Farrin from the Azure Café in Freeport, Maine.  At Azure, Chef Farrin boasts creative Italian cuisine using fresh Maine Lobster and other local ingredients.  Farrin was educated at the New England Culinary Institute (NECI) in Essex, Vermont.
The deadline for submissions is June 30, 2011, and must include a written original recipe and photo of the dish.  Judges will select the finalists and there will be a $1,000 prize to the winner of the cook-off.
The Maine Lobster Council promotes the cook-off as part of the larger event sponsored by the Portland Convention & Visitor’s Bureau. The finalists will compete for the title before an audience of 200 lobster enthusiasts, journalists and industry representatives.  The audience will watch each of the chefs demonstrate their recipes, taste a sample of each and will vote for their favorite.
Last year, more than 5,000 people attended the three day event.  But if you are not planning on being in Maine for the festival, well perhaps a little of Maine can come to you to help out you out with your own favorite lobster recipe.
“No matter where the cook calls home, fresh Maine lobster is the key ingredient to all winning lobster recipes,” said Wayne Howe, manager of the LobsterOnline web site.  “Since 1997 we have been providing chefs of all types, from Boston to Hawaii, with live lobster and New England seafood.  From our docks and facilities in Maine and Cape Cod, we can ship to chefs everywhere.”
“Simply order today by 2:30 p.m. and live lobster can be at your door the next day,” Howe said.  “That will help to make all chefs winners.”