A Traditional Christmas Eve Baked Stuffed Lobster Tail Recipe Sure to Please

For families all across the country, the traditional Christmas Eve dinner is celebrated with lobster as either the main course or a first course. This year, for many chefs,  baked stuffed lobster tails will take center stage.

Here is a traditional baked stuffed lobster tail recipe, courtesy of Chef Christopher Russel of Boothbay Harbor, Maine.  Russell is a former Maine Lobster Council Chef of the Year.

baked stuffed Maine lobster tail on a plate
Traditional baked stuff lobster tail (Maine Lobster Council).

Be sure to select fresh, live Maine  lobster. Hard shell lobster are best as the tails will be larger and more succulent.  The dish is easy to prepare and is always sure to please all your guests.

Plan on one  1-1/2  pound-lobster per person, or if convenience dictates,  fresh or frozen lobster tails may be purchased instead of whole live lobster.

INGREDIENTS:

(4 servings, cook time 20 minutes,  preparation 25 minutes, total meal in 45 minutes)

4 live Maine lobsters, each 1-1/2 pounds *
8 Tablespoons butter
2 Cups finely chopped onions (about 2 medium)
4 Tablespoons  fresh parsley finely chopped
2 Teaspoons Old Bay seafood seasoning
4 Tablespoons fresh squeezed lemon juice
4 Cups Ritz crackers crumbled (6 ounces)

DIRECTIONS:

Boil salted water in a large kettle or pot. Cook the whole lobsters for 5 minutes. Remove lobsters and place in an ice water tub to cool.  Crack and pick the meat from the claws, knuckles and body. Chop lobster meat into bite-sized pieces. Set aside. Split the tails lengthwise down the center with a sharp knife, being sure to keep the shell-side of the lobsters facing up. Make sure to keep the shells intact. Remove the tail meat from the shell and remove the intestinal track from the meat. Then carefully insert the whole tail meat back into the shell.

For the stuffing, melt the butter in a skillet over medium heat. Add the chopped onion. Sauté until soft. Stir in the parsley, Old Bay seasoning and lemon juice. Remove the skillet from heat and let cool. Stir in the chopped lobster claw and knuckle meat. Gently add in the cracker crumbs and stir. Using a spoon, add the the stuffing into the lobster tails. Refrigerate the lobster tails until ready to bake. When ready, preheat the oven to 425-degrees .  Bake the tails until the stuffing is golden and crisp,  about 15 – 20 minutes. Serve immediately with wedges of lemon and let the dinner party begin!

NUTRITIONAL:

Per serving:

658 calories

46 grams protein

37 grams carbohydrates

36 grams fat

1196 mg. sodium

2 grams fiber

* Instead of whole lobster, the dish may also be prepared with frozen Maine lobster tails. Boil water and just blanch the tails and carefully remove the meat, leaving the shell intact. Substitute 16 ounces of raw Maine crab meat or shrimp instead of the lobster knuckle and claw meat. Sauté the crab meat or shrimp with the onion and finish preparing the stuffing and the lobster tails as directed.5

© Lobsters-online 2016

 

Thanksgiving Lobster Recipe with Seasonal Nutmeg and Chestnut Flavorings

No holiday is more New England than Thanksgiving. The holiday dinner is based on Pilgrim lore.  So adding  a first course of steamed Maine lobster served in the shell with nutmeg vinaigrette and chestnut puree would add a wonderful dimension to the Thanksgiving tradition.  Not to mention being a big hit for guests and family.
Happy Thanksgiving from Lobsters Online
The lobster recipe is from Boston celebrity Chef Todd English who is on the record for being a big fan of Thanksgiving day lobster.  The recipe first appeared in Food and Wine Magazine.  It is recommended that the nutmeg vinaigrette and chestnut puree be prepared the day before.  The lobster recipe calls for 10 1-1/4 pound live lobsters steamed, and then halved with the lobster meat served in the shell.
Steamed lobster on a cutting board
Steamed Lobster
The recipe will serve 20 people.
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  • MAKE-AHEAD
  • 2 cups chicken stock or canned low-sodium broth
  • 2 cups apple cider
  • shallots, minced
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 2 tablespoons sherry vinegar
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • Two 15-ounce cans whole chestnuts packed in water, drained
  • 3 tablespoons pure maple syrup
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup crème fraîche or sour cream
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 4 large scallions, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons chopped parsley
  • Ten 1 1/4-pound steamed lobsters, halved
  • 1/4 pound mixed young salad greens 
  1. In a large saucepan, combine 1 cup of the stock with the cider, shallots, bay leaves and sherry vinegar. Boil over high heat until        reduced by half, about 25 minutes. Add the heavy cream and nutmeg and simmer over moderate heat until slightly thickened, about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat.
  2. In a medium saucepan, heat the vegetable oil. Add the onion and cook over moderate heat until softened. Add the remaining 1 cup of stock and the chestnuts and simmer until the liquid reduces by a third, about 4 minutes. Remove from the heat and add the maple syrup and butter. Transfer the contents of the saucepan to a blender and puree until smooth. Blend in the crème fraîche. Transfer the puree to a clean saucepan and season with salt and pepper. Cover and keep warm.
  3. Gently reheat the nutmeg vinaigrette. Add the scallions and parsley and season with salt and pepper.
  4. Cut the lobster tail meat into 1-inch chunks and replace it in the tail sections of the lobsters. Spoon half of the chestnut puree in the center of each of 2 large platters. Arrange the lobster halves around the puree. Spoon the warm nutmeg vinaigrette over the lobsters, garnish the platters with the greens and serve at once.

MAKE AHEAD The lobster recipe can be prepared through Step 2 and refrigerated overnight. Finish the vinaigrette and rewarm the chestnut puree before serving.

SELECTING A WINE The natural saltiness of lobster, as with any seafood, will amplify the flavor of a big fruity Chardonnay.  Go with a first course Chardonnay that is gently touched with fruit, and mostly un-oaked.

Lobsters-Online.Com

Pilgrims Had Lobster on First Thanksgiving

While the New England Lobster feast is a year round tradition older than America itself, New England seafood was a part of the first Thanksgiving. According to historical lore, the pilgrims first learned about the lobster from Native Americans.

Pilgrim Thanksgiving Feast with Lobster
Pilgrim Feast Lasted Five Days

In a letter home to England in 1621, the Pilgrim Edward Winslow wrote of how they fished, hunted and brought in the harvest to set out a feast for the entire pilgrim company and guests, including the Indian King Massasoit and 90 Indians. Winslow wrote that the feast lasted for five days. The Winslow letter was published in England in 1622 causing great excitement and helping to start the tradion of a Thanksgiving feast.

So while turkey has center stage today, the pilgrims first feast gave the lobster clambake a starring role with the turkey. For many New Englanders, the lobster is an alternative part of Thanksgiving.

The story is told about how seven Nationally known Boston Chefs eschewed the turkey one year and took the pilgrim lobster tradition to their Thanksgiving Holiday table. An article in Food and Wine Magazine published more than a decade ago tells the story of how the chef’s and their families got together at Lydia Shire’s (Biba, Towne Stove) farmhouse home in Weston, Massachusetts and created a “potluck extravaganza” to revolutionize Thanksgiving dinner.

Chef Todd English (Olives, Figs) brought the lobster and served it in its shell with a warm, creamy nutmeg vinaigrette and a chestnut puree. Every chef contributed, including Jody Adams (Rialto), Gordon Hamersley (Hammersley Bistro), Susan Regis (Biba), Chris Schlesinger (East Coast Grill), and Jasper White (Jaspers, Summer Shack). The menu included the lobster, cod, oysters, pumpkin soup, turkey and more.

Happy Thanksgiving Lobstger

While this menu would be overwhelming for most home kitchens, the tradition of holiday feasts with all the wonderful seafood from the cold, clean New England waters can be part of any family celebration this year. Thanksgiving Dinner can be extra special by serving fresh lobster and shellfish. The best part is you no longer have to go to Plimouth Plantation, Cape Cod or Maine to enjoy Maine lobster. Thanks to an online retail lobster delivery service,  live Maine lobster can be shipped overnight to any home in the United States.

Let’s eat lobster!

© Lobsters-Online.Com 2016

Boston Lobster Corn Chowder Recipe a Fall Favorite

Along comes October in New England and the tree leaves along the lobster coast are turning into an ocean of color. The days are shorter, evenings cooler and once again it’s time for a hot bowl of homemade Boston Lobster and Corn Chowder.  Made with Fresh Maine lobster and freshly harvested corn on the cob, this seasonal chowder makes a great meal for the Fall.

The Boston Lobster and Corn Chowder recipe* includes cooking a lobster stock so it will take about two hours to prepare.  The recipe will provide 4 to 6 bowls or more of chowder.  While the recipe is a favorite for the Fall when fresh corn is available, it can be made year round with seasonal corn or fresh frozen kernels.

lobster corn chowder bowl
Boston Lobster and Corn Chowder

Boston Lobster Corn Chowder Cooking Directions

Use a 10-quart stock pot filled two thirds with sea water or fresh water heavily salted,   bring water to roiling boil and add the live lobster one at a time. You only want to blanche the lobster by cooking four to six minutes.  Remove the lobster and set aside to cool.

Crack the shells with a large chef knife and pick all the meat from the tails, claws, legs and bodies. Remove the intestinal track from the cartilage and tail. Dice the meat into ¾ inch cubes, cover and refrigerate.  The bodies and left over shells will be used in the lobster stock.  The stock will take more than an hour to prepare so that must be the next step (see Lobster Stock Directions below).

While the lobster stock is simmering, husk the corn and rub with a dry towel to remove all the silk.  Carve the kernels from the cob and set aside.  Break the cobs in half and add to the simmering lobster stock.

When the stock is ready, using a six-quart pot, heat the bacon until golden brown and pour off all but one tablespoon of bacon grease.  Add butter, thyme and onion and sauté until onions are soft. Add paprika and stir about two minutes.

Add the potatoes, corn kernels and enough lobster stock to completely cover the potatoes.  Increase heat and bring pot to a boil. Cover and cook for 12 minutes until the potatoes are just softened on the outside.

Add the lobster meat and the cream and remove the pot from the heat.  Season with salt and pepper.  Allow to stand a few minutes for flavors to meld.

To serve, spoon the lobster, potatoes and corn into a large bowl and then ladle in the creamy broth.  Garnish with chives and chopped parsley.

Lobster Stock Directions

Use a six or eight-quart stock pot.  Add the lobster carcasses, shells and tomalley to the pot. Cover with water and bring to a boil. Skim any scum from the surface. Reduce heat to a fast simmer. Add the wine, tomatoes, onions, celery, carrots, garlic, thyme, bay leaves, peppercorns and fennel seeds.  Let simmer for an hour or more until the flavor is rich.  Strain the stock though a fine mesh and draw off enough to add to the chowder as required.  Any extra stock may be frozen and kept up to two months.

 

Boston Lobster Corn Chowder Ingredients

  • 3 1 ¼ pound live lobsters,  hard-shell
  • 3 large ears freshly harvested yellow corn
  • 4 ounces unsliced bacon with  rind removed and diced
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 large onion diced
  • 2 teaspoons paprika
  • 3 sprigs fresh thyme with leaves removed and chopped
  • 1 ½ pounds potatoes, peeled and diced
  • 1 ½ to 2 cups heavy cream
  • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons fresh chives minced

Lobster Stock Ingredients

  • lobster carcasses and shells
  • 2 quarts water
  • 1 cup white wine
  • 2 medium onions, thinly sliced
  • 2 stalks celery, thinly sliced
  • 1 cup tomatoes (fresh or canned)
  • 2 small carrots, thinly sliced
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 4 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 2 dried bay leaves
  • 1/4 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • Sea salt

* Traditional Lobster and Corn Chowder recipe made famous by Boston chef Jasper White.

 

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